The big night arrives; countdown to the top.


January 31st 2016. I didn’t manage to sleep until around 1:30/2am. I was wide awake and just couldn’t drift off. I woke up grumpy, not helped by the condensation in the tent making the outer fabric of my sleeping bag damp for the second night running.

One thing I’ve learnt over the years is that however you’re feeling, it never hurts to behave in a positive manner; you never know, you might fool yourself into thinking you’re more cheerful than you are. If all else fails, bacon is a good way to start the day. Imagine my delight when we were served bagels with bacon and cheese again for breakfast. Delicious as usual. I had one and a half which was probably half too much but you can’t really say no to extra food on the hill. One thing is for sure, I have not gone hungry on this trip.

Today we moved up to high camp at 5900m to be reunited with the kit we’d stashed the previous day. My pack felt heavier today than any other so far. Tincho estimated it was only around 15kg so I suspect my lack of sleep and overeating at breakfast contributed to feeling less energetic. It was another hard slog but, as always, getting into a steady non-stop rhythm is the best way to approach a challenging day. Despite slightly heavier packs than yesterday it only took us 15 minutes longer to get to camp. It certainly helped that the snow was more compact having melted and frozen last night.

We pitched the tents and tried to get settled. The game was on. We started to get our backpacks sorted ready for summit push first thing tomorrow morning. There was a climber camping near us who made conversation as we were arriving. He was very odd. He made a strange attempt at humour which came across offensive; disparaging his guide and making some reference to Johnny ‘getting it from behind’ because he was sharing a tent with Tincho.  I thought it could have been American humour I didn’t understand, but upon querying it, Bruce and Johnny assured me he was just a dick. First uncomfortable experience with another climber on the mountain.

Camp was a bleak place situated on a large plateau with rocky stacks tinged with yellow from what appeared to be sulphur. It was very busy with climbers on the way up to the top, and on the way down. There was a mixture of sick, injured, exhausted, excited, elated and weird people. The whole place smelled a little like stale urine. The toilet area was very well protected from the driving wind which battered the rest of the campsite therefore there was a mountain of human waste everywhere you looked. So much for the strict ‘Leave No Trace’ rules on the mountain. I duly used my wagbag.

It’s challenging to do anything quickly at high altitudes and even walking up the hill to get down to the toilet area was a lung buster. I had the pleasure of visiting the shit pit around 3 times that afternoon, thanks to my conscious efforts to stay hydrated. I was determined not to let a failure to self-manage fluids (or food) be my downfall on this trip. Having got our packs sorted it was just a case of eating dinner and continuing to drink.

You know, I once spent the best part of a year travelling around the world. Around 4 months into the trip I stopped in Toronto, Canada to stay with friends. The first question asked was “what would you like to eat?“. I answered, “anything as long as it comes with mashed potatoes“. After travelling through Asia for months all I craved was a bowl of mashed potato. My delightful hosts obliged with the biggest bowl of mash I’d ever seen. It’s my ultimate comfort food.

Back to Argentina. When Johnny arrived at the tent with a bowl of mashed potato, topped with bacon and mushroom gravy, I could barely believe my luck. It was another delicious meal and perhaps the perfect pre-summit treat. I was absolutely made up. After a nice mug of Sweet Dreams tea (not taking any chances getting kip tonight) it was 7:30pm and we were in bed ready to rest. The summit push started soon.

From the IMG blog: “Jonathan checked in today, reporting that the team and he had made their move to high camp.  Weather is good and winds were light.  All members made the move without issue.  That was all great news.  Plan is to prep summit gear, eat and drink, rest (as much is possible at that altitude) and get ready for a summit bid in the morning.  Forecast is favorable.  Now’s the time to see if all their patience and hard work will pay off.  They’ve done all they could to put themselves in a good position.  We wish them the best for tomorrow.https://www.mountainguides.com/wordpress/2016/01/31/aconcagua/aconcagua-team-in-position/

%d bloggers like this: